ARTIST OF THE WEEK: ED THOMAS [as featured on Nada Brahma: The World Is Sound]

Ed Thomas Nada Brahma Review
For our first Artist of the Week for 2014, we are delighted to introduce London-based singer/songwriter/producer, Ed Thomas, with his latest track, On My Own.

This soulful creation oozes an 80′s vibe that will sure make you forget about cold January mornings and transport you to somewhere sunny-side up. His classic use of mild synthetic sounds and smooth falsetto vocals gives this track it’s familiar old school feel; a sound that today’s contemporary genres are really warming to.

Since collaborating with Chase and Status in October 2013, we dub Ed Thomas as ‘one to watch’ this year. He has began to establish his musical career through a soon-to-be-released EP and by working with other big names such as Maverick Sabre in 2014. We look forward to his contribution towards a resurrection of soul vocals and expect big things to come.

Listen to ‘On My Own’ and discover more amazing music at NADA BRAHMA: The World Is Sound.

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Another world hero for the textbooks of our Children. R.I.P. Nelson Mandela

‘He no longer belongs to us; he belongs to the ages.’ – Barack Obama. Image

It is a sad day for Mankind that we lose such an iconic figure for world peace. It is a shame that half of the world will be waking up to this terrible news, while the other half of us go to sleep with him in our thoughts. It is a sad day, although we appreciate the end of a long suffering that he has felt over the last few years. 95 years is an achievement in itself.

I am proud to share the early years of my life with the later years of Madiba. Our children will see his name in textbooks as we have the great men and women before our time. They may not understand the true value of his life, suffering and inspirations but it is our duty to ensure they realise his significance and the vision of racial equality and the end of all exploitations.

‘There is no passion to be found in playing small – settling for a life that’s less than the one you are capable of living.’ Rest In Peace, Madiba.

Over and Out.

Lisa Kudrow in epic speech on sexism in politics [as featured in Scandal, USA]

This speech really hits home as it emphasises the situations that many women are put in on a daily basis and may not have the same confidence to stand up to their counterparts [male or female] that provoke gender discrimination.

It reminded me of expectations; subsequently a prominent, albeit random, memory of an expectation I was expected to adhere to came to mind. I have been told multiple times by women and men who interview for jobs that your nails must be neatly painted as part of appropriate interview presentation.

This baffles me. Painting or not painting your nails has nothing to do with the ability for a woman to do a job. Men do not have this same requirement. Is this, as Lisa Kudrow said, in order to remind you that I’m a woman? A more appropriate requirement would be clean shoes or neatly cut nails – both which signify attention to detail and pride in presentation, not personal preference of colour or an assumption that womens’ presentation is correlated to their nail colour.

I admit this was an extremely random thought and memory to come from this video, but shows us how the most unusual experiences can be made more vividly clear when you least expect it.

Over & Out

Review: Danny Ladwa performs at Google Campus, London

As featured in Nada Brahma: The World Is Sound.

Last week, standing near the back of a crowded, lower ground room overflowing with inquisitive minds, was when I discovered vocalist and beat boxer, Danny Ladwa. This review is not of the latest EP, an underground record or must-buy album, but it is an appreciation of his live performance and how it made a huge impact on many people in that room.

By day, Google Campus in Old Street is home to a cluster of tech wizards and ambitious entrepreneurs hoping to make their mark on the world. By night, the same workspace area is used for events and conferences. At an event about social entrepreneurship and changing the world, the last thing I expected was to witness a live beatboxing gig, yet Danny performed as the introducing and concluding feature of the night…

Read the full review HERE at Nada Brahma: The World Is Sound.
Danny Ladwa review featured in Nada Brahma

‘So… what are your other interests and hobbies?’

I believe that time management is extremely important. So much so that I boil everything down to how I can economise my time and fit it all in.

Recently, I have found myself increasingly lazy. I get up, I go to work, I come home and make some dinner. Many people would then go on to say that they play tennis, because they love the rush. Others would say volunteer at a youth club or even crochet as a hobby. Although not everyones cup of tea, all of these things are substantially more productive than what I now do – watch repeats of the Big Bang Theory or How I Met Your Mother or even Friends. If at a future interview, I am asked what I do in my spare time, I might as well leave the room there and then!

This has lead me to think really hard about my time and what I do with it. I used to be SO busy all the time. Why is it that I no longer feel this need to be productive after work finishes? I then realised what the difference was between my busy lifestyle 6 months ago, and my slower-paced lifestyle of today. Purpose. Most things we do have a purpose. We go to school to learn. We have a job to earn money and pay the bills. We then have hobbies or interests in order relax, enjoy and generally receive some fulfilment. We find ourselves busy because we want to fit all of these things into the day, including our extra activities.

long-day-at-work

What I have realised is that my job and my interests have merged. I LOVE my job and get extreme satisfaction from doing the work I do (touch wood). When I get home after a long 9-6 work day, I do not feel the need to ‘reclaim my creativity’ as I know many of my friends do. What I would do after my day job, is what I actually do as my day job. Therefore, I can relax in a non-productive way, letting my brain recuperate and letting my feet rest when I get home.

I must admit that I am rather lucky to be feeling this way. I must also realise that not all my jobs will bring this same satisfaction. Most of all, I must admit to myself that I will eventually get bored of watching repeats of Big Bang Theory. However, I truly believe that at some stage, everyone should take a chance and do something they love for a living and experience the relief of coming home satisfied, fulfilled and happy.

Over and Out.

Learn more about why I started this blog at About Sanum Jain.

Shivers from Chivalry?

As a 90’s child, I have been brought up in quite a confusing era. The mix of traditional values mixed with liberal progression has put us all, especially women, in a huge predicament.

Lately, I have been thinking a lot about chivalry and ‘Gentlemanly’ behaviour. I’ve spent a lot of time living in different British cities as well as abroad in Boston. I’ve also extensively travelled in the East. The same thoughts always enter my mind when I encounter a situation when a man opens a door for me and even when they don’t. Should a man feel obliged to open a door for me? As a feminist, should I allow them to do it or does this signify a weakness or inferiority? Do I have to offer to open the door for him? I JUST WANT TO GET THROUGH THE BLOODY DOOR!

9_chivalry-lessons-from-legendary-gentleman-flashAlas, this ‘palava’ occurs almost daily, especially as I enter the world of work. Just this morning, a man opened the door and signaled me to enter first. I declined and said ‘oh no, after you!’ but he insisted and I yielded.  Furthermore, my brother would shave his sideburns before allowing me to carry my own suitcase, and believe me, he loves his sideburns…

A few points I have thought about and have read on this issue…

I’ve tried to think objectively when assessing whether there are gender issues at play. Hard, I know, but I have to try. I have began to use Caitlin Moran‘s test for whether something is sexist or not – simply – ‘Are the men doing it?’. If they are not, then something must be wrong in the gender balance that needs to be assessed. In this case, are the men worried about chivalrous women or alternatively, are women extending the same ‘gentle-womanly’ courtesy to men. I would argue that they do and therefore chivalry is not benevolent sexism. In a post-feminist society, where women are (or should be) just as likely to offer to pay the bill or open the door, I think it is more appropriate to assess chivalrous behaviour as just simple politeness.  One person extending a courtesy to another based on their common decency. I might even go as far to say women seem to be expected to do these kind of things whereas men seem to want a gold star for helping a girl with her coat. I fully understand that this is quite a Western concept of manners, however. No one in China will give up a seat for you even if you were pregnant and/or on crutches…

Another, probably more controversial argument for the return of chivalry is to protect women from the fact that, whether we like it or not, we are generally the physically weaker sex. Personally, I do agree with this notion but I understand why many women may object to this statement. I’ve read that the original point of chivalry in the Middle Ages was to ensure the protection of women from men who could do them harm, had they not had the respect and civility that we can chivalry. This social construct was created to prevent violence, domestic abuse and general hostility. We all know that this may not have been wholly successful, but I fully believe that the construct of this ‘kind’ behaviour may have prevented many males from having a hostile nature towards women. We can see, for example,  a current trend  in lack of this social expectation and a dangerous increase in ‘Lad” culture.

A story from the life of Samuel Proctor (d. 1997) comes to mind here, that I read in The Atlantic. Proctor was the  pastor of Harlem’s Abyssinian Baptist Church. The story goes, he was in the elevator one day when a young woman came in. Proctor tipped his hat at her. She was offended and said, “What is that supposed to mean?”

The pastor’s response: “Madame, by tipping my hat I was telling you several things. That I would not harm you in any way. That if someone came into this elevator and threatened you, I would defend you. That if you fell ill, I would tend to you and if necessary carry you to safety. I was telling you that even though I am a man and physically stronger than you, I will treat you with both respect and solicitude. But frankly, Madame, it would have taken too much time to tell you all of that; so, instead, I just tipped my hat.”

What a babe.

633768982298016740-chivalryI figured, that as a young women, I needed to establish my position on issues such as these. I choose to view chivalry not as an act of condescension, but as a kindly respect of men for their counterparts. Sometimes I think women need to have a little less pride and men a bit more tact. This isn’t to say I would think badly of a man if he didn’t hold my door open. I would probably start blushing if he tucked in my chair at dinner or opened my car door. But, it does allow me to appreciate the awkwardnesses and limitations of both our sexes within the ever changing society we are growing up in. None of us know what we are doing and we are stuck in etiquette-limbo…

I would absolutely LOVE to hear your views on this, more than anything else i’ve written. I’ve not covered all bases, just a few quick thoughts (or whims!), so comment away!

Over and Out.

If you haven’t already, find out what adoseofpersonalwhim is about in About Sanum Jain

The Snowflake Generation.

As a member of the ‘Snowflake Generation’, I must unfortunately but amusingly agree with almost everything said in this post! Brilliantly written! So many people I know have grown up like this and I have to laugh, because, I guess that I have some of these ‘flakey’ traits too.

Humour aside, in our defence, we have been brought up in a similar dog eat dog world as previous generations except with different rules, digital weapons and a huge lack of real role models. We have been indoctrinated into using every opportunity to “Brand Ourselves” but a lot of us don’t really understand what that really means. I’m so thankful that I have watchful parents that have kept my feet on the ground!

 

Over and Out.

The Siren's Tale

Born into the Millennial generation, I can’t say I truly fit all the traits falling beneath this generational code. Generational traits are often spread through a blanketed approach for anyone falling beneath the allotted birth years. But what happens when generations are decades stretched apart, especially in modern times when life itself changes by the year, nevermind the attitudes and attributes of generations?

You’re categorized with people who share no common traits, attributes, morals, or ethics.

The differences between 1980’s Millennials and 1990’s / 2000’s Millennials are unnerving. Through working with teenagers and having unfortunate forced societal interactions with younger Millennials, the one word that comes to mind at the end of the interaction: horrified. Horrified for how children are being raised, and horrified for our country’s future.

Instead of accepting this conglomerate of Millennials, I prefer to view the Millennial generation as cutting off at 1989. For children…

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